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Life relocation – finding work

For a lot of people, relocating won’t be possible without finding a new job and so naturally it’s the starting point for moving to a new area. It can feel like a real struggle what with there often being less opportunities if you’re moving away from big cities and the fact that you may need to travel for hours just to get to interviews. There were points when we felt like giving up but hopefully these tips will make your job search a little less grim.


Where to start?!

Before cracking on, I should say straight up that if you’re self-employed or have a pretty niche job then this advice probably won’t be overly helpful. If you’re ‘an employee’ and have a relatively normal job, read on.

If, like me, you have no idea where to start with your job search, you’ll first need to narrow things down. This is going to save you a shed load of time so it really is worth doing straight away. I reckon there are only 4 scenarios that you’re likely to find yourself in before searching for a new job and working out which you fall in is the first step.

Scenario 1 | you like the industry you’re currently working in AND enjoy the role = lucky you, search for a job that’s as similar to current one as poss

Scenario 2 | you like the industry you’re working in but not so much your current role = the move is an opportunity to try a new role in your sector so search by industry

Scenario 3 | you like the role you’re in but are not a fan of the industry = you guessed it, look for similar roles in a different industry

Scenario 4 | you dislike both your current role AND the industry you’re in = what a glorious opportunity to find something totally new.

This might seem like a pretty basic way of considering your options and that’s because it is. But I wish that I’d worked this out before I started my search as it would have saved me a shed load of time and frustration.

It’ll often be the case that people fall into one of the first three scenarios but because of limited opportunities in the area they’re moving to, are forced to think more broadly. That was the case for me as I enjoyed my job and the sector, but there were very limited opportunities in the industry near York so by default I was a scenario 3’er – searching for a similar role in a new industry.

The search

With a rough idea of the role & industry you’re hoping to find a job in, you can start searching. There are a load of ways to do this and I tried them all with varied success.

Job sites/apps

Many articles online seem to diss these but it’s how I found my job so I’ve got no complaints. There are dozens of sites/apps and thousands of jobs on them so before using them I’d recommend starting out fairly specific or it could be overwhelming.

Rather than using a scattergun approach and lobbing your CV out to every job site, spending some time working out which sites serve the industry/role types you’re looking for best works better. After some research I found that LinkedIn listed the most product manager jobs (my background) and so made sure my bio was up to date and tailored towards the type of roles I was after.

Setting up alerts is well worth it because it means that A) you’re far less likely to miss great opportunities and B) nobody will apply to the job quicker than you (providing that you’re on it). You can set-up alerts on pretty much all job sites. Just make sure you’re clear about what you’re after or you’ll end up getting very random calls from recruiters that are hiring for a job that is incredibly far from what you’re looking for which is funny to start with but soon gets annoying.

Recruiters

A lot of industries rely heavily on filling roles through recruitment firms. If that’s the case for a sector you’re interested in, then you’ll want to make best pals with a few recruiters. I tried this but it didn’t work out because when I contacted them I was pretty clueless about what I wanted to do. Recruiters do not like vagueness so if you do go down this route, make sure you’re specific about what you want.

Remember that recruiters are on commission and so, understandably, their priority is to get you into a job. Any roles that they do throw your way therefore need to be properly scrutinised before applying to make sure you know what you’re in for. Having said that, you don’t have to pay to use a recruiter so there’s nowt to lose.

Applying direct

I left it way too long before properly researching employers in and around York. This is well worth doing as if you spot a couple that you like the sound of you can keep an eye on their job page and set-up alerts for that employer on job sites. I first came across the firm that I now work for by searching ‘big companies Leeds’ which sounds like what a child would do but it worked. I then set-up alerts for the company on LinkedIn and bingo.

I’ve heard of people getting results from speculative applications where you contact businesses with a CV and cover letter in the hope that they’ll remember you and get in touch when a job comes up. Or, if you are the most employable person of all-time, they could make a role for you… I don’t think this is going to work for many people but I guess there’s no harm in trying.

Friends/family

If you’re lucky enough to have contacts that work for firms that you may be interested in working for, nepotism could be the way forward. I’ve never had the opportunity to be a ‘nepotite’ but have come across A LOT of people who’ve found work through friends and family and why not? I guess the only consideration is that if it turns out you dislike the job/firm, life could get pretty awkward.

Other stuff

As for actually applying to jobs and the fun of interviews, I’ll leave that to you! But there are a few extra things I reckon are worth mentioning.

From deciding to move up to York and actually doing it took us about a year. The main reason it took so long was because I massively struggled to decide what direction to take my career in. I’m SO pleased that I persevered as our relocation is one of the best things I’ve ever done. The annoying thing about moving somewhere new is that you have to put a load of effort in before you actually get to enjoy the benefits of moving. So a bit of advice on this would be to stay determined even if you feel like giving up because the chances are it’ll be well worth it.

A big concern we had about moving north was that we’d take a big hit to our pay. Well, we now have a mortgage on a lovely 3-bed semi in a great area of York for £300 less a month than we paid in rent on our 2 bed north west London flat… And stuff like beer is cheaper too. So remember, if you’re moving north (particularly if away from London/south east/some of south west), it’s all relative. Plus, you may be surprised at how little difference there is between salaries for similar jobs in different areas.

Last thing: I found ‘What Color is your Parachute?’ to be a really helpful book about working out what job/career would suit me best. It’s a bit cheesy, but there’s some really thought-provoking stuff in there.


Truth be told, I’m hoping this post will lead to a surge in people moving up north and thus drive the price our house up. Failing that, if it helps one other human get a job in a new place to start their ‘life relocation’, then I’m happy.

If you fancy reading about how our move north happened, you can have a nosey here.

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Extension post #7 – weeks 6 & 7

Not entirely sure where to start on this one as about 6,911 things have happened since my last post. There are only a couple more weeks of the builder/electrician/plumber being around so the focus is now moving to us for stuff like fitting the kitchen, decorating, getting the flooring laid etc. so it’s time to roll our sleeves up.


Crack, crack, crack city

Week 6 started with a worrying discovery. After living away from home for a few days whilst the back wall was knocked through and steels were added, we found that some pretty confident looking cracks had appeared in the two upstairs walls that sat on the 2 walls that had been knocked through.

We’d read about it being common for small cracks to appear as the walls settle between being supported by acrows and sitting on the steel joists. But our cracks aren’t exactly hairline and at their worst are 3mm wide. Needless to say, we were pretty worried about this so had a natter with the builder. He seemed very casual about them and said that they’d just need to be skimmed over.

We were still worried so I shared images of the cracks on a forum to get a second opinion and the consensus was that the cracks are larger than should be expected and that they’d need to be properly assessed. This could have brought the build to a standstill and ended up costing a lot of money. However, fortunately, Jim from building control came round early this week and after having a look said that it’s not a major concern, phew. For a belt and braces approach, he’s recommended that metals straps are inserted into the cracks and fixed in place with resin before being plastered over. It was such a relief to hear this!

Progress

With crack-gate out of the way, I can focus on all the awesome things that have happened in the last 2 weeks. First up, the floor of the extension has now been built up to the level of the existing floor so there’s no longer a massive drop when we walk into the extension.

First fix plumbing and electrics are sorted ahead of plastering. We spent a good half hour with the electrician, working out where to put spot lights, sockets and the kitchen pendants. We may have gone a bit overboard with sockets but it’s far better to have too many than too few, as we found when we moved into this place which only had one double socket per room.

The most exciting day was probably bi-fold day. Being the old man that I am, I’ve wanted to live somewhere with bi-fold doors out into the garden for quite a while so it was pretty great when they went in.

On the side of the house, the old back door has been blocked up and a new door fitted to the right of it, where the kitchen window was, which will lead into out mini utility.

To fill in the door left by taking the back door out, the builders used bricks they saved from knocking out the back wall. The blocked in door blends in really well so we’re chuffed with the job they’ve done on that. It’s a shame to lose the wee arched porch but to get a decent sized kitchen in it’s something we had to do.

ALSO, the stud wall that separates the utility from the kitchen has been put up, and the door opening has been prepared for a door that we picked up on FB marketplace for £20 which ties in perfectly with our other interior doors.

Soon after the guys had started in the stud wall, I took them a brew and it’s a good job I did. I suggested that we check the positioning of it and after measuring the space, there was too little space left for the kitchen units so they had to start again. Far better that way than having to rip it out once it was plastered or having to lose a kitchen unit!

The last couple of days of this week have totally transformed the space. On Thursday, all the plasterboard went up and on Friday, the walls were plastered. Quite an impressive operation with 5 blokes here on both days just cracking on with it.

If ever there was a time for an image slider, it’s now. The before photo was taken on Wednesday and the after on Friday! Mental.

Extension life

It seems only right to mention the joys of life with only one downstairs room in action. Food-wise, we’ve been making the most of the slow cooker and microwave which has required some innovative thinking. We’ve been using paper plates wherever possible, but inevitably there’s still a fair amount of stuff to wash up so our bathroom is now washing up HQ.

On top of the house being a mess, despite Haz’ best efforts to put dust sheets up theres still brick dust and general dirt covering every surface. Outside, our front garden is an absolute state and the back garden is worse. Stopping Basil from trapsing dirt throughout the house and picking up things in his mouth that he shouldn’t is currently our main past time activity.

Some good, however, has come from all of this. Our downstairs doors haven’t closed properly since we moved in so to help prevent Basil running wild I planed the doors last weekend so they’d close properly. The hallway to dining room door also needed a new door knob so I made what I think is quite a fetching industrial-chic door knob out of wood but Haz isn’t a fan. We’ll see who gets the last word.


So all-in-all, a bloody decent couple of weeks. The extension is unrecognisable vs just a few days together end the end is in sight. Next week, our kitchen is due to arrive so I’ve got some time off work to get it fitted which I’m really looking forward to. Once the plaster is dry we can also start painting so we really are moving towards having an actual functioning space – this is how excited we are.

Maybe a bit more deranged-looking than excited, but you get the idea.

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Mortgages 101

You may not be surprised to hear that the word mortgage comes from the old French for ‘death pledge’. It’s hardly everyone’s favourite dinner table topic, but it’s worth knowing the fundamentals as, barring a yacht, it’s by far the biggest cost you’re ever likely to have. Here’s an attempt at describing the key things to consider when it comes to getting a mortgage without putting you to sleep (no guarantees).

I should add a cheeky disclaimer to say that I’m not qualified to advise on mortgages and am simply aiming to help answer some common questions about mortgages. When it comes to making mortgage-related decisions, speak to a qualified mortgage adviser or broker.


What is a mortgage…?

In case you have no idea what a mortgage is, it’s essentially a humongous loan which banks and building societies* will give you towards buying a property. Very few people are in a position to buy their first place in cash given that the average house price in UK is over £200,000, so a mortgage makes up the balance after you’ve paid a deposit.

Because mortgages are such large loans, they’re typically paid back over many years but a fairly standard mortgage term for a first time buyer would be between 25 and 35 years. In addition to repaying the money you’ve borrowed, there’ll be an interest rate charged on top. The lower the interest rate, the lower your monthly repayments.

There’s a lot of mortgage jargon but one term you definitely need to be aware of is ‘loan-to-value’ or ‘LTV’. All this means is the percentage of the property that you’re borrowing money for. So, if you were buying a £100,000 home with a 5% deposit of £5,000, your LTV would be 95% and your mortgage would be £95,000.

*From a mortgage point-of-view, it really doesn’t make a difference whether you borrow from a bank or building society. The key difference is that banks have external shareholders whereas building societies do not – whether this affects your decision is up to you.

How can I prepare for getting a mortgage?

Banks won’t just lob mortgages out willy nilly. Lenders have a responsibility to minimise the chance of you struggling to repay your mortgage (and of them not getting their money back) and so your ‘financial wellbeing’ will undergo a pretty thorough examination. As such, the best thing you can do to prepare for a mortgage application is minimise other borrowing (it’s sensible to maintain a small amount of credit to prove you can reliably repay it) and to make sure that you repay any loans on time and in full. This is important not only for your credit score (which needs to be as high as possible to boost you chances of getting a mortgage), but also because both your income and outgoings are taken into account when calculating how much you can borrow.

Your bank statements from the last 3 months are likely to be looked at so cut out standing orders to bookies and politely ask your friends to refrain from using hilarious references to pay you back for takeaways.

What’s the difference between going directly through a bank/building society vs a mortgage broker?

Your circumstances will determine which is best for you. As a general rule, if your personal finances are relatively standard (eg: employed, reliable income) and you feel comfortable comparing different lenders’ mortgage products online, going direct to a bank/building society is an option to consider. Bear in mind that if you go down this route you’ll be speaking to mortgage advisers** within specific banks/building societies who obviously won’t be comparing their products vs other lenders’ so the responsibility of checking this would be on yours.

If your finances are a bit more complex (eg: self-employed, poor credit history) or you’re buying a property with a non-standard construction then a mortgage broker may be your best bet as they’ll be able to search the whole market for a product to suit your specific needs. That’s not to say brokers should only be considered if you’re circumstances are a bit niche – brokers are ideal if you don’t feel comfortable comparing mortgage products between lenders as they’ll do this for you.

In terms of the rates you can get, you may think that brokers will always win as they have a wide view of the market. However, that’s not always the case once you’ve factored in the broker’s fee which you may have to pay. If the broker doesn’t charge you a fee, they’ll be getting commission from the mortgage lender which can mean the rate isn’t as attractive as if you went direct to a bank or building society. So the short answer is that neither route is guaranteed to get you the best deal. If you want to be really thorough, make an appointment with a broker AND a couple of mortgage advisers.

It’s sensible to arrange a meeting with a mortgage adviser from your chosen bank/building society or your mortgage broker before you’ve found a house that you want to make an offer on. This will allow you to learn more about how much you could borrow and which mortgage products might be best-suited to you. At this stage you will be able to get an approval in principle (AIP) which is an informal agreement of how much you can borrow. A meeting early on like this would also mean that when you do find the house of your dreams, it’s a much quicker process to get the mortgage application sorted as most of the paperwork is already done.

If this all sounds complicated and very adult-like, remember that you won’t be the first first time buyer that mortgage advisers/brokers have dealt with and it’s their job to advise you properly.

**’Mortgage adviser’ is usually used to refer to a person who works for a bank/building society who can discuss their own mortgage products with you whereas a ‘mortgage broker’ has a broad view of the market and has visibility over various lenders’ products. Both will aim to recommend the most appropriate mortgage product given your needs and will help you through the process.

How big a deposit should I put down?

As a minimum you’ll usually need to put a 5% deposit down (the current economic climate means this is likely to be more). How much you put down beyond this should be dictated by how much cash you have spare and whether you have any plans for it or not.

If the absolute max deposit you can afford is 5% then that’s fine. However, interest rates at 95 LTV (ie: with a deposit of just 5%) are a lot higher than for lower LTVs. If you’re able to put a 10% deposit down or more it may be a good idea as the interest rate you’ll pay will be much lower. As you move down the LTV bands the rate will drop down further but the most dramatic drop is from 95 LTV to 90 LTV.

When deciding what deposit to put down, don’t forget that there are several other costs of buying a house to consider and that once you’ve moved in you’ll probably want some cash in the bank otherwise you’ll be sitting on the floor until you can afford a sofa.

What mortgage term should I take?

As house prices and the age at which people buy their first home have increased, the maximum mortgage term has gone up to accommodate this. Most lenders will now offer mortgage terms of 40 years which is great from an affordability point-of-view (lower monthly payments than if you went with a shorter term meaning you can get a larger mortgage), but not ideal when 74 year old you is still working 9-5 to pay off the mortgage.

Longer mortgage terms are, overall, a good thing because they provide flexibility. Just because you’ve taken out a longer term mortgage doesn’t mean you’re committed to a mortgage for this whole period – a lot can happen in 40 years! You’ll hopefully be in a position at some point to overpay the mortgage to reduce the term.

If you’re disciplined with your money, taking out a 30+ year mortgage could be a good idea as you’ll have a lower committed monthly payment but will have the option to overpay to reduce your term if you’re in a position to do so. If you take out a 25 year mortgage and you’re stretching yourself to meet the payments there’s no flexibility as you’ve committed to paying this amount monthly as a minimum. As with all these decisions, it’s a matter of personal preference which your mortgage adviser or broker will be able to guide you through.

What does the mortgage process look like?

Whilst the process of getting a mortgage can take anywhere from a few weeks to several months (years in extreme cases), the average time from applying to getting the money and moving in is between 2 and 3 months. This may sound like quite a while and that’s because A) there a lot of steps involved and B) there a lot of humans involved and many humans = many delays. Here are the key steps that take place between applying for a mortgage and moving into your crib and if you want to know about our experience, have a gander here.

#1 | Mortgage application

Once you’ve had an offer accepted, the size of your mortgage is known so you can make a formal mortgage application either through your lender or your broker. This involves providing a load of paperwork and details of the property you’re buying so that your application can be thoroughly assessed.

#2 | Mortgage offer

You’ll receive a mortgage offer once your lender is happy that A) you’ll be able to afford your mortgage repayments and B) the property you’re buying is worth the amount you’re paying for it. To check the latter, your lender will likely require a surveyor to value the place you’re buying which is something that may be included for free with your mortgage, or may be an additional cost. Getting your mortgage offer is a big moment as theoretically it means that there’s nothing from your side that’s stopping you from making the property yours. However, there are often multiple buyers/sellers involved in a ‘property chain’ and so unfortunately you’re likely to be heavily reliant on other property sales.

#3 | Exchange

After you receive your mortgage offer there’ll typically be a period of several weeks’ paperwork and toing/froing between solicitors. Towards the end of this period, your solicitor will confirm an ‘exchange’ date with you which is ultimately the date from which you’re legally-bound to buy the property. There’ll be BIG financial penalties if you or the seller pull out at this stage. You can confidently pop open a bottle of bubbly on exchange day because you’ve effectively bought your first house 🙂

#4 | Completion

Completion day is keys day! This is a very surreal day as it involves waiting around for a call from the estate agent to say that you can pick up the keys to your new home. It’s the day that the humongous loan you’ve taken is actually released by your mortgage lender but you don’t need to worry about this – your solicitor will make sure it gets to the owner. For us, there were only 2 days between our exchange and completion dates but this period is typically longer to help people get organised eg: booking a removal firm.

Waiting for the call

What features of a mortgage are there?

There are various features to mortgages that are designed to cater to your needs and circumstances – these different features combine to create individual mortgage products. Your mortgage adviser or broker will be great at explaining these details but if you want to go in clued up, here are the key features that distinguish mortgage products.

Interest rate – this defines what your monthly mortgage payment will be. The higher the % interest rate, the higher your monthly payment.

Product fee/completion fee – some mortgages have a fee included (typically between £200 and £1,500) which you can choose to either pay up front or roll into you mortgage. We opted to roll our £495 fee into the mortgage as we could do without this cost at the time but this will end up costing more in the long run as interest will be charged on top.

Incentives – there are loads of ways that lenders try to attract your business with stuff like cashback or a free valuation.

Product type ie: fix vs tracker – the majority of people choose mortgage products which fix their mortgage payments for a period of time, but this hasn’t always been the case.

The less popular ‘tracker’ products have variable interest rates which move with the base rate that is set by the Bank of England or the lender’s standard variable rate (SVR) which is decided by mortgage lenders and typically moves up and down alongside the Bank of England base rate.

If you want to comfort of a constant payment for a certain period of time, a fixed product is likely to be right for you. If you’re happy to take the risk of interest rates rising with the hope that they’ll decrease, a variable product may be worth considering.

Product term – not to be confused with your mortgage term, product term is the period over which you’re committing to a certain mortgage product. Most people opt for a period of 2 or 5 years but longer mortgage terms are increasingly popular. After this, you can decide to take out another product with the same lender or remortgage elsewhere if you find a better deal.

Mortgage term – simply the total period of your mortgage. You can take anything up to a 40 year term.

Early repayment charges (ERCs) – if for some reason you need to back out of your mortgage before the end of the product term that you’ve committed to, you’ll likely have to pay early repayment charges as a penalty unless there are exceptional circumstances. ERCs are charged as a percentage of your outstanding loan and typically decrease for each year of the mortgage product term that you’ve committed to. For example, if you owe £100,000 on your mortgage and have to pay the 3% ERC charge for coming out of your mortgage early, you’ll be penalised £3,000.

Loan-to-value (LTV) – as mentioned above, this is the percentage of the property you’ll be borrowing. The higher your LTV, the higher the interest rate you’ll pay because you’ll be deemed a greater risk to the lender.

Overpayment allowance – most mortgage products will allow you to make overpayments on your mortgage to allow you to either reduce the mortgage term or decrease your future repayments. This allowance is typically 10% per year, meaning that on top of your monthly payments you could contribute up to 10% of the outstanding mortgage balance.

Offset mortgages – offset mortgages are useful for people who have a decent chunk of savings that they don’t want to be tied up in their home. These savings can be put into an offset savings account which reduces the interest to be paid on the mortgage.

For example, if you were in the very fortunate position of having £50K sat in the bank that you didn’t want to put into your deposit, this could be put into an offset savings account linked to your mortgage which would effectively reduce the mortgage balance that you pay interest on by £50K. The downsides are that you typically wouldn’t earn interest in the savings account and the interest rate of the offset mortgage product is likely to be higher than a standard non-offset account.


If you’ve arrived here then fair play – there are many more exciting things that you could have been doing with your time! Hopefully this has helped answer a lot of questions about mortgages and has demonstrated that they’re really not that complicated. There’s no need to worry if it doesn’t all make sense as that’s what mortgage advisers and brokers are for.

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Getting on the ladder

Costs of buying a house

No doubt the biggest obstacle to getting on the ladder is a deposit. It feels awesome when you’ve finally got together enough dollar to get your own place. That’s why it’s such a kick in the teeth when you start looking at the additional upfront costs of buying a house, and a massive wallop in the groin when you realise you’ve underestimated this (if you do like we did…)

From my casual Googling, I estimated that we’d end up spending £2,000 – £2,500 on stuff like solicitors’ fees and stamp duty – WRONG. It’s gonna vary depending on the place your buying and how many things go wrong in the process, but from our experience, content online significantly understates the added costs of buying a house. So, to help you prepare better than we did, here are all the costs that we had to fork out for when we bought our place.


Homebuyer’s survey – £245

This is the mid-level survey which involves a surveyor having a good nosey around the property to check for things like damp, structural issues and ultimately give you an overview of the property’s condition. It cost us £245 which is actually very reasonable as we went through our mortgage provider – it’d normally closer to £400/£500 for a house like ours. If you’re getting a mortgage you’ll need to get at least a basic survey done as your mortgage lender will want proof that the property they’re lending you money to buy is in good condition and worth the amount that you’re buying it for.

Structural survey – £372

Off the back of our homebuyer’s survey, a crack was found which our mortgage lender wanted us to investigate further with a detailed structural survey. Not a cost we were excited about paying but it needed to be done before we could borrow any money. If you want to know more about this saga you can read about it here.

Drainage survey – £210 

Our lender wasn’t happy with the structural survey results which meant they wanted a drainage survey doing to check the condition of our drains. Certainly not a cost we were expecting but again, we were keen to press on as the house was exactly what we were after and at a good price. Thankfully, the drainage survey came back with no issues and so we could crack on (excuse the hilarious pun) with getting our formal mortgage offer.

EICR (electric condition report) – £168

We learnt from the estate agent that the electrics hadn’t been looked at in over a decade so we thought it’d be wise to shell out for a condition report. If no work needed doing then great, if it did then we could ask for it to be taken off the price of the house.

Boiler service – £55

Same logic as the EICR – it came back all good.

Solicitor fees – £1,595

Solicitor/conveyancing fees will vary depending on the cost of the house and any additional work the solicitor has to do eg: £100 ‘processing fee’ for our lifetime ISAs. We ended up going for a fairly expensive solicitor as they came very well recommended so it doesn’t have to cost this much.

Mortgage fees – £35

The mortgage that we opted for had a £495 fee which we opted to add to our mortgage payment (worked out about £2 a month over 35 years!) so the only mortgage-related cost we had to pay upfront was the £35 CHAPS transfer fee.

Stamp duty – £750

When we bought, Boris and his cronies were all about giving first time buyer a leg up onto the ladder so luckily, the first £300K of the cost of our house was ‘stamp-duty free’. Our place cost £315K so we had to pay 5% stamp duty on the £15K over the threshold = £750. If this incentive wasn’t in place we’d have had to fork out £5,750 in stamp duty alone!


Total cost excluding deposit

Without factoring in our deposit, the total upfront cost of buying our place (a pretty modest 3-bed semi) was an eye-watering £3,430. It could certainly be cheaper than this, but equally if more things go wrong then it could well be more.

Total costs including deposit

As we both had lifetime ISAs, we got a 25% bonus on our deposit funds which meant that our savings of £25,200 + bonus equated to a total deposit of £31,500. This was a 10% deposit against the £315K purchase price. We feel very lucky to have bought during a period that the government has getting first time buyers on the ladder high on their priority list as it ended up saving us a shed load.

So the total upfront cost including the money that we contributed to the deposit came to £28,630. There’s a breakdown of all the costs at the bottom of this post to help you prepare financially, mentally, and emotionally.


So there you have it, a very large number of pounds. I wish I’d read something like this before launching into our property buying journey as the unexpected costs would have hit me less hard. The non-deposit upfront costs equated to 12% of our total cost including deposit so it really is worth taking into account!

ItemCost
Homebuyers survey£245
Structural survey£372
Drainage survey£210
EICR (electric report)£168
Boiler service£55
Solicitor fees£1,595
Stamp duty£750
CHAPS fee£35
House deposit (excluding LISA bonus)£25,200
Total upfront cost£28,630
Categories
Getting on the ladder

Top 10 tips for buying your first home

Buying a house is no walk in the park. From being on it with your finances to choosing a mortgage to whipping your solicitor into shape – there are so many decisions to make and things that can go wrong. The tips below should help make your house-buying experience a whole lot smoother and give you the best chance of getting the house you want.


#1 | Get your $$$ in order

Saving for a deposit is obviously a massive blocker for most people but Boris and co. currently love first time buyers so absolutely take advantage of it. For example, lifetime ISAs (LISAs) allow you to save up to £4,000 a year and have 25% added providing you use the money for a house deposit. We got over £6,000 of free money towards our deposit from saving in LISAs so if you haven’t got one yet, crack on!

When you start thinking about actually buying, it’s time to stop your standing order to William Hill and limit your borrowing. To get a mortgage, lenders will look at your recent bank statements and take into account outgoings when working out how much you can afford so it’s worth being stingy for at least a few months before applying.

#2 | Set your expectations early on

Once you’ve started thinking about buying your first place, you’ll find there’s not many things more enjoyable than having a big old Rightmove sesh. The temptation is to spend weeks gushing over glorious houses, only to find out at a later date that what you can’t afford more than a grotty bedsit in the stabby part of town. To avoid this disappointment, it’s well worth visiting a mortgage broker or bank/building society relatively early so they can advise you on what the maximum mortgage you can get is. This way, you can spend your Rightmove hours productively browsing properties that you’re in a realistic position to buy and avoid wasting time.

#3 | Be decisive

Buying a house can be summarised as an endless string of decisions that happen to almost all be important and expensive. If you dilly-dally when making up your mind during this process, chances are that you’ll never get a house, or certainly not the house that you want.

If you’re not naturally good at making up your mind, this can be helped by working out what you want before you start searching for it. For example, something that we found really helpful was to do shed load of location reccies and house viewings before we were even in a position to buy. It just meant that when we found ourselves in a position to buy, we knew what we wanted. Here are some helpful tips on how to choose where to live & deciding what your ‘dream’ home is.

#4 | Build rapport with everyone you deal with

One thing that shocked us about buying our place was how many people are involved in the house buying process – the seller, estate agents, solicitors, mortgage lenders, surveyors, tradesmen etc. It’s key to keep these people on side as they all have more important things to worry about. I’m not condoning bribery or flirting – just being a pleasant person to deal with who’s bothered about other people is enough. We found this to be a massive help and probably wouldn’t have had our offer accepted if we hadn’t been friendly humans.

#5 | Package your offer well

It’s easy to assume that your offer is all about the number but I don’t reckon that’s the case. When considering an offer, the seller isn’t thinking only about the money, but also things like how flexible the buyer is and the chances of things falling through. It’s therefore crucial to ‘package’ your offer in a way that gives it the best chance of being accepted. For us, this meant going to make the offer in person and stressing that we were chain free, totally flexible on move date, had our deposit ready to go, and had a decision in principle. The more reasons you can give to choose you, the more likely you’ll get the house you want at a great price so here’s how to make your offer irresistible.

#6 | Understand the house buying process

To avoid any nasty shocks and come across as if you know what you’re on about, it’s well worth reading up on what buying a house entails. It’s not particularly exciting, but spending an hour or two familiarising yourself with things like how to arrange a mortgage and what solicitors do will pay off. I’ve written about our house buying journey which should be a good starting place but I’d recommend reading more widely.

#7 | Expect unexpected costs

When people talk about the difficulty of getting on the ladder they focus on saving up a deposit. Sure, this is the biggest cost, but we were flabbergasted by the extra costs we had when buying our place. On top of our deposit, we spent £3,430 before we even stepped through the door! Don’t get caught out like us by making sure you know about all the costs that could crop up whilst buying your first home. Imagine moving in and not being able to afford the ceremonial first night takeaway, nightmare.

#8 | Be reliable/punctual/organised

Other than chasing people up, you can do little to control how other people behave whilst you’re buying your home, but you can certainly set the standard and hope this influences others. Making a point of things like swiftly replying to calls/emails and returning paperwork promptly sounds basic but it’ll get you in estate agents’ & solicitors’ good books and makes them more likely to want to help you. Plus, if you don’t get on top of this stuff it’ll get on top of you as there’s a shed load of admin involved in house buying.

#9 | Get multiple quotes

It can be tempting when choosing a solicitor or surveyor to go with the first one that comes up in your searches but this is a bit daft. It’s always worth getting at least 3 quotes so you can A) have a strong idea of what price you should be paying and B) choose people based on how they come across rather than just online reviews. I don’t mean to sound like a knob, but if somebody replies to an email enquiry in text talk and puts xoxox at the end it’s an instant no for me. Nothing beats a personal recommendation so ask friends, family and colleagues where possible. The same logic goes for plumbers, electricians and any other tradesmen you may need to use.

#10 | Meet the seller #controversial

Meeting the seller may not be possible and admittedly may not be wise in certain cases. However, based on our experience, we found this to be really beneficial. Rather than relying on solicitors and estate agents for updates, we kept in touch with the seller throughout the process and were totally transparent with each other which made the whole thing far easier. There can be a fair amount of tension and frustration between different parties involved in buying and selling houses so to have a direct line to the seller was brilliant. We still have the occasional natter on WhatsApp!


Of course, there’s a load more to buying a house well than just these 10 tips, but if you can do this this stuff right I guarantee you’ll be on course to nail life.