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DIY projects

DIY outdoor corner benches

These two corner benches make for a cracking weekend project and you don’t need loads of kit to do a good job. You could easily nail it with the gear in the must-have woodworking tools post I wrote and there’s nothing complicated about it – just lots of cutting and screwing! So if you’re thinking about getting into woodwork or have recently started, this is the one for you. Materials and equipment are at the very bottom.


Planning

This is going to be a short section because these benches are almost entirely copied from a very popular YouTube video. I made a table for a local lady who then asked if I could make a set of corner benches so rather than come up with something from scratch, I followed the tried and tested method in the video. The only addition I made was to add a middle support to the back as the lady wanted to make sure the cushions she’s adding didn’t fall away.

Cutting, cutting, and more cutting

After modelling the benches in SketchUp (brilliant free design software) and confirming the dimensions, I ordered no fewer than 27 2.4 metre lengths of pressure treated 2x4s. The benches are made entirely from 2x4s which makes them both very robust and heavy.

Because there’s so much cutting to do, it’s really difficult to work out exactly how many lengths of timber you need. I’ve come across an app called ‘CutList Optimizer’ where you plug in your cut lengths and quantities and it tells you exactly how many lengths you need and how to cut them to minimise waste. So good for keeping costs down and not having to get more wood/having loads left over.

So, with the benches modelled and cut list sorted, out came the mitre saw. You could quite easily make all the cuts with a circular saw butted up against a speed square, but I prefer using a mitre saw when I’ve got a load of repetitive cross cuts to make.

As I had the wood delivered, there were some lengths that were uglier than others. I set these aside to be used for areas that would be less visible like the inside of the frame and the noggins.

It was a bit of a ‘mare keeping track of all the sections so whapping some labels on them is a good idea.

Planed 2x4s are already pretty smooth and have a rounded edge, but a quick tinkle with a sander is still a good idea.

The final stage before assembly was to slap some wood preserver on all the cut ends to prolong the wood’s life.

Frame assembly

You could make these benches with pocket hole screws for a particularly tidy finish but I opted for your bog standard 65mm decking screws. To make these as discreet as possible, I used a combination square to keep the screw positioning consistent.

Rather than using a standard bit to drill the pilot hole and then countersink bit, I used this combo bit which was a massive time saver.

With the pilot holes drilled, I started assembling the side sections. I clamped the 2x4s to my workbench, used a square to check their positioning, and then drove in the decking screws with my impact driver.

Here’s a photo of an almost-finished side section. It’ll make sense shortly, but essentially the bottom cross piece is screwed into the frame of the seat section.

A top piece finishes off the side section. The cut edge needs to be sanded or routed with a round over bit.

Soon enough you’ll have 3 identical side sections. You only need 3 as one of the two benches is left open so it can be butt up against the other bench to make it look like one piece.

Sides done, seat frames next. These are simple rectangles with noggins to add sturdiness and to provide a point to drive the seating into.

The side sections can now be screwed into the seat frame. A couple of clamps and quick check with a square make sure that everything is positioned as it should be.

By this point it’s already a pretty heavy beast and this is way less than half its finished weight!

The final stage before screwing down the seat is to add the back section in. The very top length of 2×4 can’t be screwed in the same way as the rest of the build so I added some pocket holes to the underneath side and then propped it in place before screwing. You don’t need to to do pocket holes – you could just ‘toenail’ screws in by adding a diagonal pilot hole which would do the same job.

I then added a middle support and another just below the top length to help prevent it from sagging.

The other bench is almost identical to the first, the only difference being the one open end.

Seating

I used 6 lengths of 2×4 for the seating of each bench. Again, to keep the screws aligned I measured their position and marked them across each of the seat lengths using a square.

After doing a dry fit, we whapped everything on a trailer and made our way to the customer’s house where I’d add the seat lengths.

The very final stage was to position the 2x4s using packers to ensure consistent gaps and then screw them down into the frame.


We pushed the benches together and that was that.

The lady also bought a matching table with a built-in ice trough which looked great alongside the benches. She was buying these ahead of her daughter’s hen do and will be adding some cushions to the benches.

These benches really are an awesome first wood project. They look great and there’s nothing particularly tricky about putting them together.

At the time I bought the wood it was £9 per 2.4 metre length of treated 2×4 and so the wood came to £243 and there was probably a fiver worth of screws. Unfortunately, wood prices have gone up massively in the last few months and in the 2 weeks since I bought this timber it’s gone up to £11.75 per length!

If you fancy a slightly more challenging seating project, our decking seating might be worth a read.

Materials

  • Pressure treated 2x4s
  • 65mm decking screws
  • Wood preserver

Equipment

  • Mitre saw or circular saw
  • Combination square
  • Combi drill with countersink 3mm drill bit
  • Impact driver
  • Clamps
  • Packers
  • Orbital sander with discs or sandpaper if doing by hand
  • Router with round over bit or just use sandpaper
  • Pocket hole kit or just toenail screws in
Categories
DIY projects

DIY table with built-in ice trough

The walk from our decking to the fridge is about 20 metres and a genuinely serious first world problem. To tackle this pressing issue, I’ve made a table that has an ice trough built into it.

It’s not particularly tricky and perfect for boozy BBQs, so if you fancy having a go here are the steps. Materials and equipment are at the bottom of the post.


The trough

Before planning the build, I shopped around for a trough. The two key features I was looking for were for there to be a lip all the way round the top (so it can be supported) and for a material that wouldn’t rust. This trough from Garden Trading is perfect.

To avoid having to awkwardly lift up a trough full of ice water once it’s all melted, I wanted to add a tap to the bottom of the trough. I borrowed my Pa’s drill press and cut an inch hole.

I then whapped on a water butt tap and that was job done. Here’s a photo of the tap when the table was finished. The table is only coffee table height (45cm) so the tap isn’t visible unless you’re far away or very short.

Pocket holes

This was the first project I’ve used pocket hole screws on and I’m officially in love. The whole thing could be built with normal screwing, but pocket holes allow all the screws to be concealed, leaving a really tidy finish. In case pocket holes are new to you too, here’s a very quick summary of how they work.

Essentially, you use a pocket hole jig and a special drill bit to create a diagonal ‘pocket’ into the wood.

The below photo shows a piece of the table’s framework with pocket holes pre-drilled in preparation for screwing the table top in place.

Pocket hole screws are slightly different from a standard woodscrew in that they have a large, round pan head. This allows the head to squeeze against the shoulder pocket hole (created by the pocket hole drill bit) and so pull the two bits of timber together.

They’re also self-tapping, which means they create their own pilot hole.

The final difference is that they are tightened with square drive bits. Pretty sure this is just a brand thing to tie you in.

With the two bits of timber that you intend on joining positioned, you then screw into the pocket hole and voila.

Framework

I wanted the table to look pretty chunky so all the framework is made out of pressure treated 2x4s. After cutting all the timber to length with my mitre saw, cut ends were generously doused with end grain preserver.

The first stage of the build was to make the frame that sits around the ice trough. There are two key measurements for this stage. The first is that you want the trough to only just fit in this space, with just a mm or two to spare all the way round. The second is that if you’re covering the trough when not in use, the width of the boards you use will need to tidily cover the hole and sit on the frame. This will be more clear later on.

You can see some of the pocket holes that I pre-drilled in the below photo. It’s worth spending some time planning out exactly where you’ll need pocket holes before you start fixing things in place. I used them for all the framework as well as to fix the table top in place.

Here’s the trough sat in the frame.

Next, I screwed some battens inside the trough frame, being careful to ensure they were positioned low enough so the trough sits just below the top of the frame.

With the central section done, I fixed 2 ends of the outer frame in place.

The legs (3×3 treated posts) could then be fixed to the outer frame using, you guessed it, pocket hole screws. I was careful to make sure the legs were square before screwing.

I then added the second two lengths of outer frame.

I fixed a couple of noggins in place to add some strength but their main purpose is to provide fixing points for the table top.

Table top

The table top is made out of rough sawn, pressure treated 4x1s. I designed the table to be 118cm long so that I could halve 2.4m boards with my mitre saw, leaving a little allowance for damaged ends.

These don’t look too pretty when you get them, but a tickle with the sander and a round over of the edges with a router makes a massive difference. It took me a while to get all through all 10 lengths but it was time well-spent.

With the boards cut, sanded and routed, I laid them out on the table frame so I could select the more handsome sides to face upwards. I also spent some time working out the table overhang and the spacing between each board. I’d planned this all in SketchUp (brilliant free design software that I use for most projects now) but each board varying in width by just 1mm from the 100mm I’d planned for would affect positioning quite significantly. Nobody wants a wonky table, particularly as I’ve made two of these and one is for sale.

3mm spacers worked well. It’s important to leave gaps between the boards to allow for expansion and for water to run off, just as you would with decking.

The boards are screwed down through the pocket holes which I pre-drilled into the framework. For the two outer boards, I also slapped on some glue to add extra strength for when the table is being lifted (it’s pretty heavy).

Here’s what the table looks like from underneath.

With all the full length boards in place, I turned my attention to the middle boards.

The two central boards were cut to the same overall length as the other boards but then I cut off small sections at either end. My mitre saw blade is 3mm and so the material removed by the blade (also called the kerf) worked out to be consistent with the gaps between the boards that had already been screwed down.

Before joining the two boards that made the lid, I used a jigsaw and then router to cut out a hand hole. This was pretty fiddly and required a good sand afterwards to remove the burns caused by my blunt router bit. BUT, I think it looks much better than just cutting out a finger hole.

With the hand hole cut out, I screwed some treated lengths of batten into to bottom of the lids to keep the two sections together. Again, a quick sand and sesh with the router made these look pretty.

And that was that!


I’m really chuffed with how this table turned out and hope to get to use it loads over the summer. Now just need to buy an outdoor projector to watch England crash out of the Euros on!

The total cost for this project was just over £100, including the trough, which I thought was quite good given the price of wood at the moment.

Materials

  • Pressure treated 2x4s (framework)
  • Pressure treated 3×3 posts (legs)
  • Pressure treated rough sawn 4x1s (table top)
  • Pressure treated 22x38mm batten (for trough lid supports and re-sawn in half to support the trough)
  • End grain preserver
  • 30mm pocket hole screws
  • 40mm decking screws
  • Wood glue
  • Ice trough
  • Water butt tap

Equipment

  • Mitre saw
  • Speed square
  • Measuring tape
  • Orbital sander with various grit sandpapers
  • Clamps
  • Router with straight bit and round over bit
  • Drill press (could use standard combi drill)
  • Combi drill
  • Impact driver
  • Pocket hole jig kit including jig and drill bits
  • 3mm packers
  • Paintbrush